Continuing Story Lines



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PAC-12 Upsets Big Ten for Top Academic Reputation After Conference Realignment

 

 

Big Five Football Conferences

 

 

 

 

 

The Rankings:  1. PAC 12, 2. Big Ten, 3. SEC, 4. ACC, 5. Big 12

Austin, TEXAS July 29, 2015 — Some five years after what has come to be known as Conference Realignment, the impact on the academic reputation at highest level of Collegiate Athletics is becoming clear(er). According to an analysis performed using the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th edition, The PAC-12 now is the Top College Conference by Academic Reputation.

As you can see from the chart below, The PAC 12 toppled the Big Ten from the Top Spot, also leapfrogging the SEC and ACC.

 

Top Conf by Academic Rep 2015

Since 2008, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide has been ranking the nation’s Top 422 Colleges and Universities according to the values of their brands. Almost immediately, the Global Language Monitor, the TTMB publisher, began to see parallels between the value of a school’s brand and its perceived athletic excellence.

In 2012, GLM began a study of all the major football conferences at the time while looking ahead to the future changes then proposed. This was not necessary in 2015, since there are now only five conferences at the highest level of the game that matter:

• The Atlantic Coast Conference
• The Big 10 Conference
• The Big 12 Conference
• The PAC 12 Conference
• The SEC Conference

As before, the Patriot League and the Ivy League, two FCS conferences renowned for their academic prowess, are used as controls.

The analysis also gathered together the schools that have been overlooked by the Big 5 and hope to join one of them in a future paroxysm of conference realignment. The Select Seven schools include: Rice University, Tulane University, Southern Methodist University, University of Tulsa, University of Central Florida, University of Cincinnati, and the University of Connecticut. We treat the Select Seven as a separate conference for ranking purposes.

Highlights of the analysis:

The Biggest Winner 1 – The Pac 12 jumps over the Big Ten, ACC and SEC to the Top Spot. This was not because of the addition of Utah (Net negative) and Colorado (Net positive) with realignment, but rather because of the continuing strengthening of the academic reputation of the original PAC 10 membership. In fact, members of the PAC 12 occupied five of the top eleven spots in the university ranking.

The Biggest Disappointment – The Big 10, always an academic juggernaut only strengthened itself with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland. The addition of Nebraska was a net negative. Nevertheless, the Big Ten fell into the second position, only marginally ahead of the SEC and ACC. Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio State all finished in the top twenty of the university ranking.

The SEC and the ACC both improved their academic reputations over the last few years with the SEC bolstering its already formidable academic stalwarts with Texas A&M and Missouri. The ACC added two Eastern academic powerhouses in Pitt (founded in 1787) and Syracuse. The addition of Louisville was a net negative. Head-to-head, in the SEC vs. ACC contest, the SEC narrowly secures the win by a whisker with a last second field goal.

The Biggest Loser – The Big Twelve. Losing academic stars Texas A&M, Missouri, and Colorado while gaining West Virginia was a net negative. The Big 12, anchored by UT, a Top 10 academic school, now stands at about a third of the Academic Branding Power of the PAC 12 and Big Ten.

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the tenth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

About the Global Language Monitor

The Global Language Monitor is the publisher of the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valleyby Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com



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Elite Private College ‘Brands’ hit by the Backlash Against Elites, Entitlement & Privilege

Winners Appear Across the Spectrum:  Elite Public Institutions, Technical and Specialized Schools

 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition
Austin, Texas, July 20, 2015 — For the first time, the ‘brands’ of elite private colleges have been hit by the backlash against elites, entitlement and privilege. In fact, for the first time, a major shift has been detected in the brand perceptions at the top of the rankings  with elite private universities being pushed further down the rankings by their elite public counterparts.  This according to the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.
MIT, a school remains atop the list with the nation’s Top Collegiate Brand for the second, third, fourth consecutive analysis.
The Elite Private Universities, such as Harvard, Chicago, Stanford, Penn and NYU all lost some brand equity.  In fact, the University of California system took  the No.2, 3 and 4 spots led by UCLA, Berkeley, Davis and  San Diego.
“Over the last several years there has been a mounting backlash against those perceived to be elite, entitled and privileged,” said Paul JJ Payack,  Editor-in-Chief of the TTMB College Guide.
“This is exemplified by the Top 1%, Anonymous and Occupy Movements.  The recent racial tension in Florida, Ferguson, Missouri, Baltimore, and Staten Island and the subsequent “Black Lives Matter” Movement have called further attention to perception of a growing gap between rich and poor or ‘haves and have nots’.
The chorus has been recently joined by reputable analysts such as Malcolm Gladwell, the author of Tipping Point and New Yorker writer, who famously tweeted about a recent $450 million gift to Harvard, “If billionaires don’t step up, Harvard will soon be down to its last $30 billion”  and “After all, Harvard is only the world’s richest university, with an [endowment] that’s larger than the gross domestic products of Jordan, Bolivia, Iceland and about 90 assorted other countries.”

This is the type of near real-time movement that the TTMB was designed to monitor — often representing wider societal trends.   The methodologies of, for example, US News, are designed to monitor factors that change more slowly over time, such as peer opinions and endowment size.  While others are mainly concerned with career-tracking information, and the like.

TTMB 2016 College Guide

Download the PDF Now! ($19.95) 

Kindle Now Available for

Download the Kindle Version Here ($8.38)

These are the Top 25 US Universities for 2015.  The Elite Public Universities that moved up this year are highlighted in light blue.   The Elite Private Universities that lost ground in their Brand Equity are highlighted in taupe.
 
Top 25 Universities

The University of Florida and Florida State University both continued their rise and took the No. 32 and No. 33 spots respectively.  Penn State, which had a resurgence since its football scandal, fell back to No. 52 (from No. 42), suggesting some lingering effects.

In the College Division, Wesleyan University (CT) tops the list of Top US Colleges, supplanting the US Military Academy (West Point).  The School of the Art Institute of Chicago took the second spot, the highest ever ranking from the Art, Design and Music Category.  The College of the Holy Cross (Holy Cross) placed third. Williams and Richmond rounded out the top five.

 The 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide is available by download for immediate delivery.
This is the tenth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding eight years.  There have now been four different schools taking the top spot Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.
There are 199 Colleges in the rankings.  These are the Top 40 US Colleges for 2015.
Top US Colleges 1 to 40
New York, California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Texas and Ohio  lead the “Top States for Top Colleges”.  TSFTC details the top universities and colleges foe each state.  (Forty states have Top Schools represented.}
 
Top States for Top Colleges
 
Highlights of  The 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition include detailed analysis of each of these specialty categories:
Specialized Category Leaders
The 222 Top US Universities 1. MIT, 2. UCLA, 3. Berkeley
The 199 Top US Colleges 1. Wesleyan (CT), 2. SAIC, 3. Holy Cross
The Top US Private Universities 1. Chicago, 2. Harvard, 3. Stanford
The Top US Public Universities 1. UCLA, 2. Berkeley, 3. UC Davis
The Top US Private Colleges 1. Wesleyan (CT), 2. SAIC, 3. Holy Cross
The Top US Public Colleges 1. West Point, 2. Annapolis, 3. Air Force
The Top Engineering Universities 1. MIT,  2. Virginia Tech, 3. Georgia Tech
The Top Engineering Collages 1. Harvey Mudd, 2. MSOE, 3. SD School of Mines
The Top Catholic Universities 1. U San Diego, 2. Boston College, 3. Notre Dame. 
The Top Catholic Colleges 1. Holy Cross, 2. Siena College, 3. Willamette
Top Denomination-related Colleges 1. St Olaf, 2. High Point, 3. Muhlenberg
Top Military and Service Academies 1. West Point, 2. Annapolis, 3. Air Force
Top Art, Design, and Music Schools 1. School of the Art Institute AIC, 2. Pratt Institute, 3. School of the Arts, PA
Top Women’s Colleges 1. Smith, 2. Wellesley, 3. Barnard 
Top Historically Black Colleges and Universities 1. Morehouse, 2. Spelman, 3.Rhodes
Methodology:  For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others.  This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum.  The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear.  This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com



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Top Trending Business Buzzwords for Global English in 2015

 

The World of Business as Reflected in English Language Buzzwords, Second Edition

Austin, Texas, June 17, 2015– The Global Language Monitor has announced the Top Business Buzzwords of the Year, for Global English, the world’s pre-eminent language of commerce.

“It is often noted that the world of business includes its own specialized vocabularly, and this can certainly be found in the English language, the business language of the planet,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “The Top Trending Business Buzzwords of 2015 represent some six continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language. This is the second annual ranking,”

​GLM’s Word of the Year and Business Buzzwords of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Girl-with-Big-Eyes-Reading

Top 50 Business Buzzwords

Rank, Previous Rank, Change, Business Buzzword, Comment

2015       2013       Change Business Buzzword           Comment

1              1              0              Content  — Far and away the No. 1 Business Buzzword leader

2              37           35           Net-Net – Consider a sportswriter for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team: “The net-net for the Nets was the netting of the final shot.”

3              10           7              Big Data — Soon Human Knowledge will be doubling every second. ’Big’ does not begin to describe what’s coming at us.

4              19           15           At-the-end-of-the-day — More likely the end of the quarter or fiscal year

5              2              -3            Social Media — Reality: Social media impacts less than 15% of the Web

6              15           9              Offline — ‘I’ll be offline’. The statement is meaningless unless one includes cell phones, tablets, smarty TVs, not to mention all atomic clocks.

7              41           34           Face time– Before it was a product, it was a meeting with a C-Level executive.

8              9              1              Ping — High tech lingo seeping into the mainstream; now it means ‘get back to you’. Originally, a tool to send message packets to a network address to measure the time & quality of the response.

9              44           35           Rock-and-a-hard-place — A supposedly intractable situation though it usually gets back on track (Our ‘between Iraq and a hard place’ is being replaced because of the on-going political situation}

10           20           10           Win-Win Much — more positive than tie-tie or lose-lose

11           35           24           As if it was — Used some four times more than the correct, ‘as if it were’. You know, conditional voice.

12           7              -5            Utilize (rather than use) — Please deflate the diction and utilize the word ‘use’

13           5              -8            Literally  — Principally used in non-literal situation, e.g., “Literally, an explosion of laughter”.

14           11           -3            Any noun used as a verb — To concept. To ballpark, and the like ….

15           6              -9            Guru — Someone moderately skilled in a subject or particular field (cf. ‘rocket scientist’ or ‘brain surgeon’).

16           42           26           Re-purpose — Finding a new use for an old ‘solution. Unfortunately anything thing can be re-purposed, including your job (or yourself).

17           8              -9            Robust — Applies to oh-so-many products: software, tablets (computer and otherwise), coffee, perfume, mileage, and hundreds of others

18           38           20           Value-add — P+E+VA, where Product (is P) + Enhancement (is Ε ), and Value add (is VA)

19           4              -15          Transparency — Remains a goal far from corporate reality; perhaps a handy scale would be 1} Opaque, 2} Translucent, 3) Transparent.

20           12           -8            Seamless — Seldom actually seamless (Cf. Obamacare website), often merely ‘seemless’ or meaningless

21           3              -18          Sustainability — No. 1 Word in 2007; have been rising in BizBuzz every year

22           51           29           Hashtag — The number-sign and pound- sign grows more powerful every day.

23           16           -7            Bandwidth — Measurement of electronic communications devices to send and receive information with upper and lower limits

24           40           16           Glass is half-full — Used nine times more that glass is half empty …

25           22           -3            Pro-active — Evidently better than amateur-active

26           46           20           Quick-and-dirty — Cited tens of thousands of times; we prefer ‘quick-and-clean’

27           18           -9            Synergy — The interaction of two efforts that result in a greater return than the sum of the two

28           14           -14          The Cloud — Everything (and every one) now apparently ‘lives in the cloud’ though networking clouds pre-date the web by a decade or two

29           36           7              In the Cloud — Yes, dwelling within the Cloud merits a special mention.

30           21           -9            Game changer — A step way below a paradigm-shift but still usually an exaggeration nonetheless.

31           48           17           Touch base — Another baseball allusion: if you don’t actually touch the base you are ‘called out’. Cf Cricket allusions, such as using ‘sticky wicket ‘ for a quandary.

32           13           -19          Moving Forward — From the results of those countless ‘moving forwards’, moving sideways might be more appropriate

33           23           -10          Rock Star — What’s the hierarchy among Guru, Rocket Scientist, Brain Surgeon, and Rock Star?

34           39           5              Future proof — In reality an impossible feat because it assumes you are cognizant of future events; in Marketing, just another day of concepting.

35           47           12           Push the envelope — A phrase few actually understand; Originally a descriptor of breaking through the sound barrier by X-Series Test Pilots (e.g., X-15).

36           33           -3            Ballpark — Another name for a ‘guesstimate’ (another baseball allusion).

37           31           -6            Multi-task — Swapping in and out of tasks quickly is the key to multi-tasking not doing many things as once which actually decreases productivity (as imagined by Dave Nelson and other tech industries leaders in the 1970s).

38           30           -8            110% — We believe it’s time to synchronize the exertion scale. As a hiring manager, how do you compare 110% from an Ivy school with an exertion level of 130% from the Big Ten?

39           26           -13          Resonate — Produce or be filled with a deep, full, reverberating sound, belief or emotion

40           29           -11          Deliverable — An output, product, result, or outcome; a term of great flexibility.

41           27           -14          Monetize — The attempt to transmute Internet lead into gold.

42           34           -8            Flounder                — A ship might ‘founder’ along New England’s rocky coastline. Over time the act of foundering became collated with flounder the fish. Your grasp of the language is telegraphed by this confusion.

43           32           -11          Rocket science –One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Brain surgeon).

44           17           -27          New paradigm == Revolutionary new ideas that change the then-existing worldview; think Copernicus, think Newton, think Einstein, most definitely not your next product.

45           28           -17          Double Down — To double an investment in an already risky proposition.

46           43           -3            Brain surgery — One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Rocket Scientist.

47           45           -2            Bleeding edge — Leading edge of the leading edge (top ten per cent).

48           50           2              Low-hanging fruit — Easy pickin’s for the sales force; unfortunately, obsolete since 2008

49           24           -25          30,000 foot level — Let’s decide if we are viewing the topic from the 30,000-, 40,000-, or 100,000 foot level. Airlines typically fly at a 35,000 foot cruise level

50           49           -1            Herding cats — Used in high tech circles for several decades regarding controlling headstrong engineers, a seemingly impossible task.

51           25           -26          Out-of-the-Box (experience) — OOBE is evermore important to the marketing of consumer electronic devices.

This study is updated from earlier in the year.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 375,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.​

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com



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Evolve, Trigger & Almond Shaming Top Global Language Monitor’s Politically (in)Correct Words of 2015

For Immediate Release

For more information, call +1 512 815 8836 or email infor@languagemonitor.com

The Eighth Survey of Global English

 

Austin, Texas, June 10, 2015 — Evolve, Trigger & Almond Shaming Top Global Language Monitor’s Politically (in)Correct Words of 2015.  This is the The Global Language Monitor’s eighth survey of Global English, the world’s first, true global language with some 1.83 billion speakers dominating multiple aspects of global communication.

“We label these words and phrases Politically (in)Correct because of the fierce debate they often stir and incur,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of the Global Language Monitor. “People spanning the  political spectrum can find the phrases politically ‘correct’ or ‘incorrect’ depending on their particular views”.

Politically Correct Emoji

The Top (in)Politically Correct Words and Phrases for 2015 include the following:

Arranged by ranking, word or phrase, and Commentary

  1. Evolve – Interesting evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in US Political jargon.More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ have you noticed that politicians never evolve BEFORE voters shift their positions?
  2. Trigger – Being ‘triggered’ by studying lessons that involve reminders of past traumatic events.

2a. Snowflakes — The impolite term used by other students describing those triggered.

  1. Almond Shaming – Public Shaming is reinvented as a pressure tactic for all kinds of supposed crimes, now featuring attacks on the almond, which each take a gallon of water to grow.  How many gallons of California water have you snacked on today?
  2. Lying as a greater truth – If the lie you speak, though obviously false, continues to support your greater agenda, then how can it possibly be false?
  3. Occam’s Razor – A hallmark of scientific inquiry since the Enlightenment, is a plea to explain theories by the simplest possible explanation: entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity. Now considered quaint, illogical and most definitely ‘unscientific’.
  4. Not Safe – Bring exposed to ‘triggering events’ without specific warnings from the teacher.
  5. Catharsis – Ancient idea (ideal) that confronting a work of art that contains ‘triggers’ will actually purge one’s triggering emotions.
  6. ‘Thugs’ — President used ‘thugs’ to describe Baltimore rioters; the word is from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) describing Aryan assassins.
  7. Anthropogenic warming — The existence of the Bering Land Bridge some 20,000 years ago suggests that the Oceans were some 300 feet lower than today. (That’s about a football field.)
  8. War on Women — In the Islamic state, women and young girls (6 and older) are stolen from their homes and then sold into sexual slavery or forced into involuntary marriages. And this after watching the beheading of their husbands, sons and brother

The Top Politically Incorrect Terms and Phrases in previous surveys include:

  • 2012       ‘His and Her’ (Sweden) – The Swedes once again promoting gender-neutrality, this time its with personal pronouns:  him [han in Swedish], her [hon] and he/she [hen].
  • 2009:  Swine Flu — Various governments and agencies for political motives ranging from protecting pork producers to religious sensitivity insist on calling it by its formal name: influenza A(H1N1)
  • 2008:  “He Can’t Win” – Hillary Clinton’s coded reference to Barack Obama’s ethnic background as an insurmountable impediment to him winning the US Presidency.
  • 2007:  Nappy-headed Ho — Radio personality Don Imus’ reference to the women on the Rutgers University championship basketball team.
  • 2006:  Global Warming Denier – Scientists not denying climate change, but the role of humans in the millennia-old process.
  • 2005:  Misguided Criminals – A BBC commentator attempts to strip away all emotion from the word ‘terrorist’ by using ‘neutral’ descriptions for those who carried out the 7/7 tube bombings.
  • 2004:  Master/Slave computer jargon – LA County re-labels computer documentation to remove this alleged slur that has been used for decades describing computer hierarchies.

 

In December 2014, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Smiley Emoji was the Global English Word of the Year for 2014.  Theses Politically (in)Correct are automatically nominated to Global Language Monitor’s 16th Annual Word of the Year #WOTY announcement for Global English at year’s end.

To see the Top Words of 2014, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.To see the Top Trending words of 2015 thus far go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.



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Flashback from 2014: FIFA Corruption Scandal Impacts World Cup Marketing Partners

 

FIFA Corruption Scandal Impacts World Cup Marketing Partners

June 13, 2014, Austin, TEXAS — The apparent disarray in Brazil, and the looming corruption scandal involving the Qatar bid for 2022 World Cup, has had outsized impact on FIFA 2014 Sponsors and Partners.  This according to an analysis completed by the Global Language Monitor the first day of play in the beleaguered 2014 World Cup.
Fifa Brazil

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Overall, some 9.26 percent of mentions of the FIFA Partners and Sponsors are affiliated with  ‘corruption’, ‘disarray’, or similar terms.  When Partners and Sponsors are measured for these terms separately, Partners come in with a 9.2  percent brand-affiliated rate while Sponsors’  brand affiliation number came in at 9.3 percent.  This means that overall both Sponsors and Partners are both implicated evenly. However, this is not the case on a brand-by-brand level.  Overall brands had differing rates of affiliation. When measured by the Global Language Monitor’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the individual brands comprising the FIFA World Cup Sponsors and Partners had significantly differing levels of  ‘affiliation’.   Overall, the average BAI of the partners was 166.7, while that of the sponsors was 28.7.  The higher the BAI, the more closely a brand is linked to the corruption scandal.

Fifa Brazil Ad

You can download the “FIFA ‘Corruption’ and ‘Scandal,’ Impacting World Cup 2014 Partners and Sponsors”  by clicking here.

The six World Cup 2014 Partners are ranked by their Brand Affiliation Index(BAI) when linked to 2014 World Cup and words like “corruption”.  Their scores range from 279.   to 50.86.

Here are the six World  Cup  Partners ranked in descending order of their BAI scores.

  1. Sony
  2. VISA
  3. Adidas
  4. Hyundi-Kia
  5. Coca-Cola
  6. Emirates

The eight World Cup 2014 Sponsors are ranked by their Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) when linked to 2014 World Cup and words like “corruption”.  The scores range from 73.47 to 1.42.

  1. Budweiser
  2. OI Telecommunications
  3. Moy Park
  4. Yingli Solar
  5. Continental Football
  6. McDonald’s
  7. Johnson & Johnson
  8. Castrol Motor Oil

There are a number of press reports detailing the efforts of some brands to downplay the effects on the scandal to their brand.  When your brand could be sullied in fro of the 3.4 billion television viewers of World Cup 2014, their concerns, whether or not admitted, are serious and significant. The individual  numbers are determined by Global Language Monitor’s (GLM) Brand Affiliation Index (BAI),  a proprietary, longitudinal study that analyzes the global association between (and among) individual brands and their competitors or, in this case, the FIFA World Cup 2014.  The value of  World Cup sponsorship continues to rise, from $10 million for lessor arrangements to partnerships approaching $200 million, though these fees are dwarfed by Olympic partnerships, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad.

About Global Language Monitor:  “How will the Global Trends Impact Your World?”
Founded in Silicon Valley in 2003, Austin, Texas-based GLM collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call  +1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com

 

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Farewell to David Letterman!

Top Ten Words of 2010 on Letterman

Over the years the Global Language Monitor and David Letterman have crossed paths a number of times.  This Top Ten List send-up remains among our favorites!


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The Top Trending Words of 2015: ‘Beast Mode’, ‘for convenience’, & ‘Thugs’

Princess Charlotte is already Top Name

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,080,646.4 (May 8, 2015 estimate)

 

AUSTIN, Texas May 8, 2015 –  Beast Mode, ‘for convenience’, and Thugs lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2015, followed by Deflate Gate, and  Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor, the big data, trend tracking consultancy.   This is preliminary to GLM’s thirteenth annual Word of the Year (#WOTY) rankings that will be released at year-end.

“By the fifteenth year of the 20th century, the world was already awash in the trends that would influence the rest of the century, reaching all the way into the early 21st century.” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “The twenty-first century trends that accompany these words might similarly portend far greater events than we can ever imagine today.”

The Top Trending Words of 2015 are listed below  (Rank, Word, and Comment). 

 

Top Trending Words for 2015

Rank Word Commentary
1 Beast Mode Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch os the Seattle Seahawks (American football}.
2 For convenience Hillary Clinton’s explanation on why she used a private email address for State Department business.
3 Thugs President used ‘thugs’ to describe Baltimore rioters; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
4 Deflate Gate Pushing the rules to the limit, as in deflating the football to give an advantage to the home team.
5 Princess Charlotte Pound-for-pound, the biggest media sensation since the Kardashians broke the Internet.
6 Deep learning Techniques used to get machines closer to intelligence, artirfical or otherwise.
7 Anthropocene A proposed geologic epoch acknowledging humans influence upon the Earth.
8 Drone (as a verb) As in, ‘the enemy located, identified, and droned’.
9 Digital Darkness What happens if we can no longer access digital information?  A distinct possibility at some future point.
10 Invisible Primaries Follow the money, that also seems to work …
11 Near-Nude Have you noticed the exposure on the runways and red carpets lately?
12 Migrant-electorate (from the UK) New migrant electorate numbering some 4 million non-Brits in the UK.
13 Evolve The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in US Political jargon.  More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it never occurs until the voters first shift their position.
14 Intelligence Explosion Even France is loosening up regulations in this regard.
15 Almond Shaming Among the most visible water hogs of curent California drought, now entering its fourth year.
Copyright ©2015 The Global Language Monitor

Others under consideration:  Billanthropy, #BLM, and Snowpochalypse (again)  A number of trending words did not yet meet the triple threshold  test, but might qualify as the year further unfolds.

In December 2014, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Smiley Emoji was the Global English Word of the Year for 2014.

To see the Top Words of 2014, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana: Kate and Wills Go the Thoroughly Modern Route

Charlotte and Elizabeth ranked No. 2 and 3 on the contemporary name analysis

May 4, 2015 Austin, TEXAS — The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have gone the thoroughly Modern Route in naming Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge — Charlotte Elizabeth Diane.

The names Charlotte and Elizabeth ranked No. 2 and 3 on the contemporary name analysis combining recently popular girls names in the UK, US, and Australia. Diana, of course, is the name of Prince William’s mother.

Royal Baby Charlotte

Kensington Palace announced Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge given name is that the baby was born at 8:34 a.m. London time (0734 GMT) and weighed 8 pounds 3 ounces (3.7 kg),  The Global Language Monitor has examined three dozen feminine names from the British royal lineage over the last 300 years and then cross-referenced them with recently Popular Girls Names of UK, US and Australia.

Members of the British Royal Family often carry several names, as many as four or five are in contention. Queen Elizabeth’s full Christian name is Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. while Price William’s is William Arthur Philip Louis.

The Top Popular Female Names in the UK, US and Australia according to TrendTopper Internet MediaBuzz were cross-referenced with traditional with British Royal Names (back to A.D. 1700)– Copyright 2015 Global Language Monitor

Rank/Name/UK US, AUS Combined

1 Amelia

2 Charlotte

3 Elizabeth (Isabela/-bele)

4 Emma

5 Alexandra

6 Isla

7 Savannah

8 Sarah

9 Anne

10 Gabriella

 

Traditional Names for females in the British Royal Family ranked by GLM’s exclusive Brand Affiliation Index (BAI).

Rank/Name/BAI

1 Alexandra 10.82

2 Marina 9.48

3 Amelia 8.17

4 Elise 7.07

5 Louise 5.14

6 Alice 5.10

7 Charlotte 5.01

8 Flora 4.25

9 Julia 4.19

10 Estella 3.94

11 Gabriella 3.54

12 Catherine 2.73

13 Lyla 2.38

14 Paola 2.35

15 Beatrice 2.26

16 Anne 2.10

17 Diane 2.02

18 Mary 2.00

19 Isla 1.93

20 Sylvana 1.84

21 Sarah 1.79

22 Savannah 1.79

23 Maud 1.54

24 Heloise 1.29

25 Victoria 1.24

26 Emma 1.17

27 Elizabeth (Isabela/-bele)

28 Camilla 0.84

29 Eloise 0.74

30 Zara 0.59

31 Margaret 0.54

32 Alexandra 0.29

33 Helen 0.27

34 Davina 0.24

35 Alexa 0.23

36 Zenouska 0.00

The analysis was updated in May 2015.

Occurrence of Female Names in the British Royal Family — Copyright 2015 Global Language Monitor

About The Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 



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‘Green’ Dethrones ‘Climate Change’ as the Top Earth Day Word for 2015

Global Language Monitor’s Earth Day Words that Changed the World analysis

Since 1970 a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language.

New Words and New ‘Senses’ of Old Words

 

Austin, Texas,Earth Week April 2015. For the first time since its annual survey began, ‘Climate Change’  has been dethroned in the Global Language Monitor’s Earth Day Words that Changed the World analysis.  ‘Climate change’ fell to No. 7 while its close companion, ”global warming fell to No. 12. in the fourth annual analysis of Global English.

Earth Day Graphic

Since the first Earth Day was celebrated as an ‘environmental teach-in’ on April 22, 1970  a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language. The Global Language  Monitor has determined the top new words and new ‘senses’ of old words that have been  engendered since that first Earth Day. The words are ranked by order of present-day usage in the English-speaking world. The study was updated the second week of April 2015

“The fact that neither ‘climate change’ nor ‘global warming’ tops this years list is interesting, indeed,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM.  “In fact,there appears to be a profound shift in the awareness of  environmental change on everyday living-level. This is certainly suggested by words like ‘eco-‘, free-range, and vegan moving toward the top of this year’s list.”

The words analyzed are but the most profound examples of a movement that has been gaining momentum at least since the 1960s, especially since the publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring.

GLM used its Narrative Tracker methodologies to determine and rank the Earth Day words. The criteria included determining which words have had an impact on the environmental movement and/or were influential in its growth.

The Top Words Engendered by Earth Day and the Environmental Movement since 1970 are listed below.

Rank/Word/Last Year’s Rank/Definition

Rank Word 2014 Change Comment
1 Green 3 2 Practices that are in harmony with nature.
2 Eco- (as a prefix) 5 3 Shorthand for ‘ecological'; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).
3 Free-range 26 23 The animal has been raised with access to the outside; not the same as ‘free roaming’.
4 Sustainable 2 -2 The ability to create self-replicating systems that can persist over time.  Sustainable was GLM’s word of the year in 2006.the environment.
5 Vegan 6 1 Those who abstain from eating animal or dairy products, often avoiding any products made from animals (such as leather or gelatin); coined in 1944 in the UK by Donald Watson.
6 Emissions 12 6 In this sense, gases and particles sent out into the atmosphere through industrial production, automobiles, etc.; from the Late Latin emittere, to send out of.
7 Climate Change 1 -6 Now used twice as much as the term ‘global warming’.  Originally favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily dues to long-term atmospheric cycles.
8 Ecology 7 -1 The relations of beings to each other and their environment; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).
9 Recycle 8 -1 The re-using of materials once viewed as waste.
10 Renewable energy 15 5 Energy derived from solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and similar ‘sustainable’ sources.
12 Global warming 4 -8 Favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily due to human influence. (Compare Climate  Change, above.)
13 Solar Power 28 15 China adds Solar the Size of France’s total capacity in First Quarter of 2015
14 Biomass 22 8 Material derived from plants that can be used as a renewable energy source.
15 Hybrid (car) 9 -6 Cars that use a mixture of technologies to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels.
16 Biodegradable 18 2 Organic material that decays naturally in a relatively short time.
17 Organic food 16 -1 Food grown or produced without synthetic fertilizers, insecticides, hormones, irradiation and genetic modification.
18 Greenhouse gas (GHG) 19 1 Any gas emitted into the atmosphere that trap heat (e.g., CO2); without them the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans; with an excess the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans.18. Solar power (12) — Energy derived by harnessing the sun’s electromagnetic radiation.
19 Carbon footprint 17 -2 The total amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions generate by a human activity.  Driving a late-model, fuel-efficient car emits about 6 pounds of CO2 every ten miles.  Term first used in 1980.   Alternative definition — Your life reduced to the a series of equations on energy (carbon) consumption.
20 Biofuels 23 3 Finally, we are reaching a break-even point with sugar based biofuels in Brazil.
21 Natural (food) 14 -7 Food grown with without artificial ingredients (such as color)  and produced in a manner similar to that used in a well-stocked home kitchen.
22 Post-consumer (waste) 20 -2 Material that can be used as a resource to build new products.
23 Greenhouse Effect 24 1 The heating of the Earth’s surface in a fashion similar to a greenhouse, with GHG acting as glass windows that trap heat.  The result of the increased emission of CO2 and other GHGs.
24 Greenwash 21 -3 Highlighting aspects of a product that may or appear to be favorable to the environment in order to re-shape its brand image.
25 Locavore 10 -15 Thinking globally while eating locally.
26 Carbon trading 25 -1 Trading, in effect, the rights to pollute between different manufacturers in the global marketplace.
27 Xeriscape 13 -14 Literally ‘dry landscaping'; using natural elements in a desert landscape for yard enhancement.   Begging the question:  must every yard resemble an English Manor?
28 Save a Tree! 27 -1 One of the first rallying cries of the Environmental Movement.  Unfortunately, replacing a renewable resource with one made of petroleum created ecological problems of its own.

For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor collected data from the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture.  GLM  analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.  The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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The Top Business Buzzwords of Global English for 2014

Second Annual Survey

The World of Business as Reflected in English Language Buzzwords

Austin, Texas, Easter Weekend, 2015– The Global Language Monitor has announced the Top Business Buzzwords of the Year, for Global English, the world’s pre-eminent language of commerce.

“It is often noted that the world of business includes its own specialized vocabularly, and this can certainly be found in the English language, the business language of the planet,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “TheTop 50 Global Business Buzzwords of 2014 represent some six continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language. This is the second annual ranking,”

​ GLM’s Word of the Year and Business Buzzwords of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.
Top 50 Business Buzzwords
GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 375,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.​
2014 2013 Change  Business Buzzword  Comment
1 1 0 Content Far and away the No. 1 BizBuzz leader
2 37 35 Net-Net Consider a sportswriter for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team: “The net-net for the Nets was the netting of the final shot.”
3 10 7 Big Data Soon Human Knowledge will be doubling every second. ’Big’ does not begin to describe what’s coming at us.
4 19 15 At-the-end-of-the-day More likely the end of the quarter or fiscal year
5 2 -3 Social Media Reality: Social media impacts less than 15% of the Web
6 15 9 Offline ‘I’ll be offline’. The statement is meaningless unless one includes cell phones, tablets,smarty TVs, not to mention all atomic clocks.
7 41 34 Face time Before it was a product, it was a meeting with a C-Level executive.
8 9 1 Ping High tech lingo seeping into the mainstream; now it means ‘get back to you’. Originally, a tool to send message packres to a network address to measure the time & quality of the response.
9 44 35 Rock-and-a-hard-place A supposedly intractable situation though it usually gets back on track
10 20 10 Win-Win Much more positive than tie-tie or lose-lose
11 35 24 As if it was Used some four times more than the correct, ‘as if it were’. You know, conditional voice.
12 7 -5 Utilize (rather than use) Please deflate the diction and utilize the word ‘use’
13 5 -8 Literally Principally used in non-literal situation, eg, Literally, “an explosion of laughter”
14 11 -3 Any noun used as a verb To concept. to ballpark, and the like ….
15 6 -9 Guru Someone moderately skilled in a subject or particular field (cf ‘rocket scientist’ or ‘brain surgeon’)
16 42 26 Re-purpose Finding a new use for an old ‘solution. Unfortunately anything thing can be re-purposed ,including your job (or yourself).
17 8 -9 Robust Applies to oh-so-many products: software, tablets (computer and otherwise), coffee, perfume, mileage, and hundreds of others
18 38 20 Value-add P+E+VA, where Product (is P) + Enhancement (is Ε ), and Value add (is VA)
19 4 -15 Transparency Remains a goal far from corporate reality
20 12 -8 Seamless Seldom actually seamless (Cf Obamacare website), often merely ‘seemless’ or meaningless
21 3 -18 Sustainability No. 1 Word in 2007; have been rising in BizBuzz every year
22 51 29 Hashtag The number- and pound- sign grows evermore powerful
23 16 -7 Bandwidth Measurement of electronic communications devices to send and receive information with upper and lower limits
24 40 16 Glass is half-full Used nine times more that glass is half empty …
25 22 -3 Pro-active Evidently better than amateur-active
26 46 20 Quick-and-dirty Cited tens of thousands of times; we prefer ‘quick-and-clean’
27 18 -9 Synergy The interaction of two efforts that result in a greater return than the sum of the two
28 14 -14 The Cloud Everything (and every one) now apparently ‘lives in the cloud’ though networking clouds pre-date the web by a decade or two
29 36 7 In the Cloud Yes, dwelling within the Cloud merits a special mention.
30 21 -9 Game changer A step below a paradigm-shift but exaggeration nonetheless
31 48 17 Touch base Another baseball allusion: if you don’t actually touch the base you are ‘called out’. Cf Cricket allusions, such as using ‘sticky wicket ‘ for a quandary.
32 13 -19 Moving Forward From the results of those countless ‘moving forwards’, moving sideways might be more appropriate
33 23 -10 Rock Star What’s the hierarchy among Guru, Rocket Scientist, Brain Surgeon, and Rock Star?
34 39 5 Future proof In reality an impossible feat because it assumes you are cognizant of future events; in Marketing, just another day of concepting.
35 47 12 Push the envelope A phrase few actually understand; Originally a descriptor of breaking through the sound barrier by X-Series Test Pilots (e.g., X-15)
36 33 -3 Ballpark Another name for a ‘guesstimate’.
37 31 -6 Multi-task Swapping in and out of tasks quickly is the key to multi-tasking not doing many things as once which actually decreases productivity (as imagined by Dave Nelson and other tech industries leaders in the 1970s).
38 30 -8 110% We believe it’s time to synchronize the exertion scale. As a hiring manager, how do you compare 110% from an Ivy school with an exertion level of 130% from the Big Ten?
39 26 -13 Resonate Produce or be filled with a deep, full, reverberating sound, belief or emotion
40 29 -11 Deliverable An output, product, result, or outcome; a term of great flexibility.
41 27 -14 Monetize The attempt to transmute Internet lead into gold.
42 34 -8 Flounder A ship might ‘founder’ along New England’s rocky coastline. Over time the act of foundering became collated with flounder the fish. Your grasp of the language is telegraphed by this confusion.
43 32 -11 Rocket science One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Brain surgeon).
44 17 -27 New paradigm Revolutionary new ideas that change the then-existing worldview; think Copernicus, think Newton, think Einstein, most definitely not your next product
45 28 -17 Double Down To double an investment in an already risky proposition
46 43 -3 Brain surgery One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Rocket Scientist.
47 45 -2 Bleeding edge Leading edge of the leading edge (top ten per cent)
48 50 2 Low-hanging fruit Easy pickin’s for the sales force; unfortunately, obsolete since 2008
49 24 -25 30,000 ft level Let’s decide if we are viewing the topic from the 30,000-, 40,000-, or 100,000 ft level. Airlines actually fly at a 35,000 ft cruise level
50 49 -1 Herding cats Used in high tech circles for several decades regarding controlling headstrong engineers, a seemingly improbable task.
51 25 -26 Out-of-the-Box (experience) OOBE is number 25 on the list of TrendTopper

 

 



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